Jekyl

We assisted some animals at a house in NE a few yrs. ago. They had 2 aggressive dogs on chains and one dog that was indoor/outdoor and was getting pretty old. I brought the two chained dogs in for sp/n and vaccinations. I had to have them on the control stick to even get them in and get them altered. After taking them back, we would visit every once in a while. There was nothing that we could do other than leave supplies for the owners to use. We couldn’t even get the fly gel on their ears, they were so unaccepting of us. We monitored less and less-it was kind of one of those houses that it is what it is. These people were totally on meth or something and were high every time we went. It was a sad situation and there wasn’t much we could do except leave hay and food in the winter and fly products and food in the summer.

Eventually the older dog died. We went by less and less often because there really was not much we could do here and we constantly had more and more cases thrown our way. We received a call from this woman a couple of weeks ago that her min pin was sick. She told us that her other chained dog, named Demon, had died as well. She said this dog had been throwing up, not eating, and had lost a lot of weight. I figured she had gotten a new dog because none of her dogs were min pins when I was going over. I sent Marilyn and Lauren over to check it out. They went up to the door expecting to step inside and  take a look at the min pin. Marilyn glanced over to the pen in the front yard (they had a little dog pen in the front yard now that hadn’t been there before). There was a dog in there that was lethargic, emaciated, dehydrated, barely able to get up and walk. Marilyn asked about that dog and what was going on with him and the lady said, “that’s the one I called about!”. It wasn’t a min pin, it was Jekyl, who used to be about a 40 lb. bad ass dog. He looked absolutely terrible. The girls called me and described everything and I told them to take him to Independence Animal Hospital and I would meet them there. When I walked in and saw Jekyl, who I hadn’t seen in a long time, it was so unbelievable that it was even him, but it was. I didn’t even recognize him. He was so very, very thin and his ears were a bloody mess from the flies.

He was a skeleton. He was very, very dehydrated. He was dying, his little body was shutting down. However, he did muster enough strength to try and bite the vet. It was a struggle to get him out of his crate. Unfortunately, he had to be muzzled to be examined. It was all very sad. This little boy had never known any kindness, so who could blame him for wanting to bite? It was all he’d ever known.

Jekyl was indeed dying. He was very jaundiced, emaciated-in terrible shape. We drew some blood and ran a heart worm test and he was strongly positive. We decided to put him down. He was suffering. This little boy had had a miserable existence.  Finally Jekyl, as peacefully as possible, left this difficult world. I thought, “just fly out of here, baby-you’re free now.” It was incredibly sad.

Chain of Hope has got to be out there. Thanks for keeping us there.

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One Response to “Jekyl”

  1. Lois Says:

    I’M SO SORRY FOR YOU JEKYL. YOU ARE AT PEACE KNOW. ITS TO BAD THAT THE PEOPLE THAT HAD HIM CAN’T HAVE THE SAME TREATMENT DONE TO THEM. ANIMALS SHOULDN’T BE LEFT TO SUFFER. I CAN’T STAND PEOPLE WHO TREAT THEM BAD.REST NOW IN PEACE.

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